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Modified 10/2017
Page V_95
...Research Test results for the question:
 ... Given identical violin wood parts of the same Rub Tone, does Wood Tone of each part effect the sound produced? .......
..For this test I chose identically shaped violin wood pegs (ebony wood), of a given (pre selected and sorted) Rub Tone.
..I then arranged them by the relative Wood Tone in a row, without identifying what the Rub Tone is. (So this qualifies as a double blind test...?).
..For the test, I then tapped downward on the junction area of each tuning peg with a pencil like shaped spruce wood tapper, listening to the response as I moved down the lineup.
..I put down a strip of blue masking tape in front of the pegs so that I could note any special responses of better sound quality I might hear.
..After this, I used my Wood Tone scale tool and evaluated the Wood Tone of each peg (estimating those Wood Tones between the Wood Tone Scale positions ( which are: 162 HZ, 176 HZ, 198 HZ, 213 HZ, 242 HZ, 287 HZ, 324 HZ, 352 HZ, 396 HZ)
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..This first example test was of my tuning peg collection that had a # 30 Rub Tone Scale rating. I used a rawhide leather mallet to get the Wood Tone response and ordered them in increasing relative Wood Tone response from left to right. (Two or more in a vertical line means that those pegs had the same Wood Tone response as the lowest example).
..In this test the 3rd, 7th, and 9th pegs had noticeably 'good' response sound (and were then marked with the black '^' marking on tape, while the others did not sound good.
..The actual Wood Tone for each represented Wood Tone frequency was then measured / estimated, and noted on the bottom blue masking tape strip.
..The 'good' sounding pegs had Wood Tone Scale Frequencies of, respectively, 213 HZ, 352 HZ, and 396 HZ.
The summary result is thus: Tuning Pegs of matching Rub Tone, sound clearly better when they are precisely on the Wood Tone Scale.
..My conclusion is that any piece of wood on the Wood Tone Scale will sound significantly better; no matter what the Rub Tone rating.
..It is highly recommenced to only use wood parts on a musical instrument that are exactly on the Wood Tone Scale.
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..Test Number One:
..This second example test was of my tuning peg collection that had a # 28 Rub Tone Scale rating. I used a rawhide leather mallet to get the Wood Tone response and ordered them in increasing relative Wood Tone response from left to right. (Two or more in a vertical line means that those pegs had the same Wood Tone response as the lowest example).
..In this test, none of the pegs had noticeably 'good' response sound.
..The actual Wood Tone for each represented Wood Tone frequency was then measured / estimated, and noted on the bottom blue masking tape strip. No examples were on the Wood Tone scale.
 The summary result is thus: Tuning Pegs do not sound 'good' unless they are on the Wood Tone Scale.
..My conclusion is that any piece of wood on the Wood Tone Scale will sound significantly better; no matter what the Rub Tone rating.
..It is highly recommenced to only use wood parts on a musical instrument that is exactly on the Wood Tone Scale.
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..Test Number Two:
..This fhird example test was of my tuning peg collection that had a # 22 Rub Tone Scale rating {# 22 has been found to be the ideal Rub Tone level for instrument making woods, with about a 10% tonal drop off on either side for each number higher or lower.}. I used a rawhide leather mallet to get the Wood Tone response and ordered them in increasing relative Wood Tone response from left to right. (Two or more in a vertical line means that those pegs had the same Wood Tone response as the lowest example).
..In this test the 4th, and 7th pegs had noticeably 'good' response sound (and were then marked with the black '^' marking on tape, while the others did not sound good.
..The actual Wood Tone for each represented Wood Tone frequency was then measured / estimated, and noted on the bottom blue masking tape strip.
..The 'good' sounding pegs had Wood Tone Scale Frequencies of, respectively, 287 HZ, and 396 HZ.
The summary results is thus: Tuning Pegs of matching Rub Tone, sound clearly better when they are precisely on the Wood Tone Scale.
..My conclusion is that any piece of wood on the Wood Tone Scale will sound significantly better; no matter what the Rub Tone rating.
..It is highly recommenced to only use wood parts on a musical instrument that is exactly on the Wood Tone Scale.
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..Test Number Three:
..This fourth test asks the question; for wood identical examples of the ideal # 22 Rub Tone, and all examples tested to be on the Wood Tone Scale, is there an preferred Wood Tone for that specific part? (Wood Tones here of 176, 198, 213, 242, 287, and 396 HZ)
 .. The comparative sound quality was evaluated by tapping with a spruce tap tool. Results noted by repositioning (see second photo)
..The summary result is thus: Tuning Pegs of 213 HZ on the Wood Tone Scale was superior, with the 198 HZ and 242 HZ samples exhibiting about a 5% tonal drop (one Wood Tone Scale position distant from the 213 HZ ideal), and those of 176 HZ and 287 HZ exhibiting about a 10% tonal drop (two Wood Tone Scale positions distant from the 213 HZ ideal), and finally the 396 HZ sample showing about a 20 % tonal drop (four Wood Tone Scale positions from the 213 HZ ideal).
..My conclusion is that although any piece of wood on the Wood Tone Scale will sound 'good', that there is an ideal Wood Tone for each violin wood part. Additionally that the tonal loss is measured to be about 5 % for each Wood Tone position distant from that ideal.
..It is highly recommenced to only use wood parts on a musical instrument that are of the ideal Wood Tone Scale for that violin part and exhibiting a # 22 Rub Tone.
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..Test Number Four:
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